Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (The 2/4th Battalion)

Research and Resources around the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry during WWI

Archive for the tag “Killed in Action”

1917, APRIL 4th – FRONT-LINE EAST OF SOYECOURT

By G. K. Rose.

By G. K. Rose.

 Snowing all day. The front posts were heavily shelled during the morning; 1 killed, 2 wounded.

From The Story of the 2/4th Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, by Captain G. K. Rose M.C. (Oxford: B.H. Blackwell, 1920)

In the early morning of April 4 the 59th Division, which was operating on the Battalion’s left, attacked Le Vergier. Fighting continued till noon, but the village was not taken. The 59th lost heavily. As they formed up for their advance–which was for some 1,000 yards across the open and exposed to view–behind the line the Battalion was holding, considerable enemy fire was brought down upon us and I lost Sergeant Watkins, wounded in the arm, and several other casualties. It snowed nearly all day. In the shallow trenches, which were ill-sited both for drainage and concealment from the enemy, life was miserable. 

Killed in Action 4th April 1917

201985 Private George Loveridge (Likely to have been D Company)

Died of Wounds 4th April 1917

201448 Private Creswick Franklin

1916, AUGUST 10th – IN THE TRENCHES AT FANQUISSART: AN UNLUCKY SHELLS KILLS LIEUTENANT R. J. E. TIDDY

Lieutenant Reginald John Elliott Tiddy 2/4th Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

Lieutenant Reginald John Elliott Tiddy
2/4th Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry

Laventie, Showing The Fauquissart Sector 1916 From the The Story of the 2/5th Gloucestershire Regiment 1914-1918, by A. F. Barnes, M.C.

Laventie, Showing The Fauquissart Sector 1916
From the The Story of the 2/5th Gloucestershire Regiment 1914-1918, by A. F. Barnes, M.C.

From The Story of the 2/4th Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, by Captain G. K. Rose M.C. (Oxford: B.H. Blackwell, 1920)

 Early in August an unlucky shell deprived the Battalion of one of its best officers. Lieutenant Tiddy had joined the Infantry in a spirit of duty and self sacrifice, which his service as an officer had proved but to which his death more amply testified. The regrets of friends and comrades measured the Battalion’s loss.

 Killed in Action 10th August 1916

Lieutenant Reginald John Elliott Tiddy

Tiddy’s war was quickly over; he was posted to France in May 1916 and killed by a stray shell on August 10 while searching for wounded comrades.

1916, AUGUST 21st – RELIEVED THE 2/4th ROYAL BERKSHIRE REGIMENT IN THE FANQUISSART SECTOR

Laventie, Showing The Fauquissart Sector 1916 From the The Story of the 2/5th Gloucestershire Regiment 1914-1918, by A. F. Barnes, M.C.

Laventie, Showing The Fauquissart Sector 1916
From the The Story of the 2/5th Gloucestershire Regiment 1914-1918, by A. F. Barnes, M.C.

Killed in Action 21st August 1916

1538 Private James Henry Light

War Diary of the 2/4th Royal Berkshire Regiment

1916-08-21

Regiment. 2/4th Royal Berkshire

Location France, Fauquissart

Entry Relieved by 2/4 OXFORD and BUCKS LI. Relief complete at 6pm. Marched into old Billets at LAVENTIE.

1916, JULY 1st – FRONT LINE TRENCHES IN LAVENTIE SECTOR UNDER HEAVY SHELLING

Laventie, Showing The Fauquissart Sector 1916 From the The Story of the 2/5th Gloucestershire Regiment 1914-1918, by A. F. Barnes, M.C.

Laventie, Showing The Fauquissart Sector 1916
From the The Story of the 2/5th Gloucestershire Regiment 1914-1918, by A. F. Barnes, M.C.

 

Killed in Action, July 1st 1916

200546 Private Henry (Harry) George Hayward

3537 Private Alexander John Rennie

Died of Wounds, July 1st 1916

4199 Private Frank William Hartwell

5346 Private Percival Gordon Lines

5459 Private George Morris

War Diary of the 2/4th Royal Berkshire Regiment

1916-07-01
Regiment. 2/4th Royal Berkshire
Location France, Laventie
Entry Working Parties. Heavy shelling heard on Right front. One Coy stood to arms 11-11.45pm.

1916, NOVEMBER 29th – HEAVY BARRAGE ON REGINA TRENCH

Trenches Near Grandcourt November and Dececember 1916

From The Story of the 2/4th Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, by Captain G. K. Rose M.C. (Oxford: B.H. Blackwell, 1920)

At 5 p.m. on November 29, 1916, the Germans opened a heavy barrage with howitzers on the front line, giving every indication of impending attack. Regina Trench, where were the headquarters of C and D, the companies then holding the line, was also heavily shelled, and telephonic communication with the rear was soon cut. On such occasions it was always difficult to decide whether or not to send up the S.O.S — on the one hand unnecessary appeal to our artillery to fire on S.O.S. lines was deprecated, on the other, no forward commander could afford to guess that a mere demonstration was on foot; for the appearance of attacking infantry followed immediately on a lifting of the barrage, a symptom in itself often difficult to recognise. On this occasion I intended and attempted to send up a coloured rocket, but its stick became stuck between the sides of the dug-out shaft and, by the time the efforts of Sergeant Collett had prepared the rocket for firing, the barrage died down as suddenly as it had started. This very commonplace episode illustrates the routine of this phase of warfare. The trenches were, of course, blown in and some Lewis guns damaged, but, as frequently, few casualties occurred.

While speaking of the life furthest forward I do not forget the very similar conditions, allowing for the absence of enemy machine-guns and snipers, which prevailed at Battalion Headquarters. Confined to a dug-out (a smaller replica of Regina) in Hessian Trench, with a continual stream of reports to receive and instructions to send out, and being continually rung up on the telephone, Colonel Bellamy and Cuthbert had their hands full, and opportunities for rest, if not for refreshment, were very limited. Nor do I omit our runners from the fullest share in the dangers and activities of this time.

Under battle-conditions life at one remove from the front line was rarely much more agreeable than in the line itself, and was less provided with those compensations which existed for the Infantryman near the enemy. It was necessary to go back to Divisional Headquarters to find any substantial difference or to live an ordered life on a civilised footing; and there, too, responsibility had increased by an even ratio. The Battalion Transport during this time was stationed at Martinsart and its task, along bad roads, in bringing up rations each day was not a light one.

KILLED IN ACTION NOVEMBER 29th 1916

4106 Private William Wilsdon

PRIVATE WILLIAM (BILL) LOVERIDGE

Killed in action 23rd February 1918 in the frontline trenches between Gricourt and Fayet, with the 2/4th Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry.

Name: William Loveridge
Birth Place: Oxford
Death Date: 23 Feb 1918
Death Location: France & Flanders
Enlistment Location: Oxford
Rank: Private
Regiment: Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry
Battalion: 2/4th Battalion
Number: 202276
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

In the 1901 Census he was listed as a Paper Mill Labourer.

In the 1911 Census he was shown as a Fitter’s Labourer at the Paper Mill in Wolvercote, Oxfordshire.

Married Margret Josephine Harrison in 1911. I believe they had a son William Alfred Loveridge.

 

 

Private Alfred Dan Page

Rank: Private
Service No: 29157
Date of Death: 22/08/1917
Age: 34
Regiment/Service: Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry 2nd/4th Bn.
Grave Reference XXI. C. 2.
Cemetery NEW IRISH FARM CEMETERY

Additional Information:

Son of William and Mary Ann Page, of High Wycombe; husband of Bertha Helen Page, of 71, West Wycombe Rd., High Wycombe, Bucks.

From Buckinghamshire Remembers:

Name Alfred Dan PAGE
Rank/Number Private   29157
Regiment Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry   2/4th Battalion
Enlisted High Wycombe
Age/Date of death 34      22 Aug 1917
How died/Theatre of war Killed in action   France & Flanders
Residence at death
Cemetery New Irish Farm Cemetery, Ieper, Belgium 
Grave or Memorial Reference XXI.C.2
Location of memorial High Wycombe Hospital
Date/Place of birth c1883      High Wycombe
Date/Place of baptism 07 Feb 1883 High Wycombe
Pre-war occupation of Casualty carpenter & joiners apprentice
Parents William George (late) & Mary Ann Page
Parent’s occupation baker and grocer
Parents’ Address (last known) High Wycombe
Wife Bertha Helen Page
Wife’s Address (last known) 71 West End Rd, High Wycombe

Please see:

The Attack on Pond Farm, 22nd August, 1917

The Attack On Pond Farm and Other Strong Posts, 21st -24th August 1917

Attack on Strongpoints, South East of St. Julian, 22nd August 1917

The Third Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele)

Private Percy Dalby Pipe

Percy Dalby Pipe was the eldest of four brothers that were killed within a year of each other. Please see the post on Lance Corporal Edwin George Pipe. Percy was killed on the first day of the German Spring Offensive when the battalion was in the front line of one of the most powerful artillery offensives ever. His last remaining brother, Sergeant Robert Henry Pipe, who served in the same battalion, died of his wounds 8 days later.

Rank: Private
Service No: 200938
Date of Death: 21/03/1918
Age:
Regiment/Service: Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry 2nd/4th Bn.
Panel ReferencePanel 50 and 51.
Memorial: POZIERES MEMORIAL

National Probate Calander, 5 June 1920:

PIPE Percy Dalby of 9 Queen’s Road Beccles Suffolk. Private 2/4th battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry died 21 March 1918 in France. Administration (with Will) Ipswich 5 June to William Dalby Pipe printer’s estimating clerk. Effects 203 13s

Private George Herbert Dawe

Name: George Herbert Dawe
Birth Place: Meary, Devon
Residence: Saltash, Cornwall
Death Date: 14 Apr 1918
Enlistment Location: Paignton, Devon
Rank: Private
Regiment: Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry
Battalion: 2/4th Battalion.
Number: 235137
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theater of War: Aldershot
Comments: Formerly 45733, Devon Regt.

From: Landrake, Cornwall, Roll of Honor

DAWE, George Herbert Private 235137, 2nd/4th Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry. Killed in action 14th April 1918. Aged 31. Born Meary, Devon, enlisted Saltash, resident Paignton, Devon. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dawe, of Essex House, Saltash, Cornwall. Formerly 45733, Devonshire Regiment. No known grave. Commemorated on PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium. Panel 7.

Also see:

Battle of Lys, 14th April 1918

The Divisions Involved in the Battle of Hazebrouck, 12th – 15th April, 1918

Private Caleb (Kaleb) Arthur Wyatt

Name: WYATT, CALEB ARTHUR
Initials: C A
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Private
Regiment/Service: Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry
Unit Text: 2nd/4th Bn.
Age: 26
Date of Death: 29/06/1916
Service No: 5325
Additional information: Son of Samuel and Mary Jane Wyatt, of Adderbury West, Banbury, Oxon.
Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference: II. B. 9.
Cemetery: LAVENTIE MILITARY CEMETERY, LA GORGUE

Name: Kaleb A. Wyatt
Birth Place: Adderbury, Oxon
Residence: Oxford
Death Date: 29 Jun 1916
Enlistment Location: Adderbury, Oxon
Rank: Private
Regiment: Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry
Battalion: 2/4th Battalion.
Number: 5325
Type of Casualty: Killed in action

Please see: Baptism of Fire, 29th June 1916.

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